Sunday Spy


Having missed Friday, and of course, taken Saturday off, the Spy has a little catching up to do.

Irwin Stelzer at The Weekly Standard explains why American hasn’t lost its fundamental advantages:   “Translation: if we get our policies right, there is no reason America can’t recapture the optimism and energy that we once called “the American dream.”

As for getting the policies right, we could start here.

Now playing on TVs all across New York City.  Whoever the Republican nominee is, he’ll have a hard time carrying New York, so this is really a reminder to some of Obama’s biggest fundraisers

Remember the Water Cycle?  Rain to streams, to evaporation to clouds to rain?  That’s pretty much the Dems’ game: tax money, to failing businesses and unions, to political contributions.  Except the Water Cycle didn’t leak water the way this system leaks money.

What’s the matter with saying that, if this $1,000,000,000 is critical, it’s more important than some other $1,000,000,000 that the government is spending somewhere else?

The warmists’ war on science continues.

Just when you thought Moore’s Law was in serious danger, ever smaller flash memory is on the horizon.

Verlander is the MVP.  So what if he’s a pitcher?  I’m hoping that the Tigers will give him one last tune-up on the 20th or 21st down in KC, so I can drive down to see him.

Why the mortgage lawsuit against the banks is going to be a tough sell.  “Many of these same banks got themselves in serious financial trouble by gorging on their own toxic mortgage securities, which dims the fraud angle.  Unfortunately, being arrogant idiots with the risk appetite of a coked-up skydiver is not a crime.”

All that talk about the debt ceiling debate changing the discussion, maybe it wasn’t just talk.

“If you’re wondering exactly who has been the first to lose confidence in the European banking system, look no further. It seems that at the forefront is the European banking system itself.”

Apparently, Obama’s new economic advisor believes that increasing wages causes an increase the demand for labor.  There are some boutique situations where higher prices help define a brand.  Entry-level labor isn’t one of them.

A California ballot initiative would shift virtually all mortgage risk onto the lender.  You can see the ads now: “Welcome to California.  Cash Only.”  It’s as though someone was reading Atlas Shrugged, saw some of the legislative proposals there, and drew all the wrong lessons.

And lest we risk becoming too earnest, some corporations know how to communicate with shareholders.

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